News

Bateman comes back to Township council

Jordan Bateman - Langley Times file photo
Jordan Bateman
— image credit: Langley Times file photo

Jordan Bateman is coming back to Township council.

This time, however, the former councillor will be facing politicians, rather that sitting among them.

Bateman has been invited to speak to council in his capacity as B.C. communications director of the Canadian Taxpayers Federation.

He will be asked to comment on the CTF’s Contract with Taxpayers, a pledge which candidates in B.C.’s civic election were invited to sign in time for the civic election last November.

The pledge includes support for a Taxpayer Protection Bylaw which punishes any mayor and council for raising taxes above the rate of inflation. If they fail to do this, they are punished with a 15 per cent pay cut for one year.

Among the pledges:

* I will not vote to raise property taxes beyond the provincial rate of inflation (unless I get approval from taxpayers in a referendum)—and will diligently try to get increases lower than that;

* I will move our municipality toward fee for service for as many functions as possible;

* I will not vote to take on or fund services that are the proper jurisdiction of federal, provincial or regional governments;

* I will push my municipality to investigate partnerships with other governments, non-profit organizations and businesses to reduce costs of service delivery;

* Infrastructure and public safety will be my top budgetary priorities;

* Taxpayers’ personal property rights will be respected and upheld;

* Under my watch, citizens will receive complete, accurate and timely information from their municipal government. I will ensure taxpayers have the opportunity to participate in open dialogue with the mayor and council, voicing their opinions on any matter affecting the municipality;

* I will publicly disclose and publish copies of all receipts I charge to my municipal expense account; and

* I will support measures that improve transparency and accountability, such as a Municipal Auditor General, introduction of municipal politician recall rules, and the use of referenda, plebiscites and citizen initiatives to gauge public opinion on major expenditures and issues.

Also in time for last year’s civic election, the Canadian Federation of Independent Business came up with a pledge to taxpayers which 50 candidates signed:

1) Property Tax Fairness — by committing to reduce the gap between what commercial property and residential property owners pay in each year of their term;

2) Reasonable Spending — by committing to keep operating spending increases reasonable, i.e. at or below the level of population growth and inflation or the rate of growth in disposable income; and

3) Openness and Accountability — by supporting in principle, the creation of a Municipal Auditor General for B.C., to perform value-for-dollar audits.

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.

You might like ...

B.C.-only wines to come to some grocery stores
 
Virk shuffled to new job after Kwantlen flap
 
Hunters protest shift favouring non-residents
Province okays transit tax referendum question, with some tweaks
 
Hunter protest over new regulations to benefit guides fills Langley meeting room
 
Second Langley farm hit by avian flu
Food scraps to be banned from garbage cans Jan. 1
 
New colour scheme for development is fine with church
 
UPDATE: 11th farm hit with Avian flu, outbreak that started in Chilliwack enters U.S.

Community Events, December 2014

Add an Event


Read the latest eEdition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Dec 18 edition online now. Browse the archives.