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Langley Fine Arts students’ songs fill forest

Langley Fine Arts Grade 12 student Duncan Lee and more than 40 of his classmates participated in a sing-along at McLellan Forest last week. - Monique Tamminga/Langley Times
Langley Fine Arts Grade 12 student Duncan Lee and more than 40 of his classmates participated in a sing-along at McLellan Forest last week.
— image credit: Monique Tamminga/Langley Times

If a large group of students sing in a forest, does anybody hear? Members of Watchers of Langley’s Forests (WOLF) sure hope so.

The singing voices of more than 40 Langley Fine Arts high school students filled the air inside McLellan Forest last  week (Nov. 15).

With rays of sunshine peaking through the tall trees, a few sang songs about the forest. That was followed up by a break out group renditions of We Are Young by Fun and Someone You Used to Know by Gyote. Several girls started a “Lean on Me” singsong.

It was actually LFAS senior students’ initiative to tour the McLellan forest and find creativity inside the 25 acres that is up for sale by the Township. The Township has given WOLF until mid December to raise $3 million to buy the forest.

“I wasn’t aware of this forest but now I am. People can come here for walks. It’s a great place to take in nature,” said Grade 11 student Ellen Bubb.

Grade 12 student Ben Comin said he admits he didn’t think much of coming to the forest.

“Then I come here and see so many people care about this forest. For an arts school like ours, this forest can provide inspiration. It’s beautiful,” said Comin.

That’s exactly why poet and Fort Langley resident Susan McCaslin and her husband Mark got involved in the cause.

“Mark and I were overwhelmed by the beauty of it,” said McCaslin. She spoke to the LFAS students about the forest and how it is for sale at the school before they came to tour the forest.

Mayor Jack Froese also spoke to students last week, explaining the Township’s position and reasoning for selling the land it owns. The Township wants to use the land sale money to help build a community centre in Aldergrove.

“This is about heritage for the next generation,” said McCaslin about saving the forest. “I think it’s wonderful to bring art and activism together,” she said.

Members of WOLF showed the students around the forest, showing them the hollowed out cottonwood tree that could be more than 200 years old. Students asked what will likely happen to the forest if it is sold.

WOLF’s (Watchers of Langley Forests) Kirk Robertson told them it will most likely be estate homes, maybe 10 at the most. But nothing is certain.

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