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Neighbours worry about noise from truck repair shop

Speaking for nearby residents, Rob Dekam (L) told Langley Township council that another noise study needs to be done before a commercial vehicle sales and repair facility in the 9700 block of 203 Street is approved. Property owner John Williams (R) told Langley Township Council the delays because of resident noise concerns over his proposed facility have added $1 million to his expenses. - Dan FERGUSON/Langley Times
Speaking for nearby residents, Rob Dekam (L) told Langley Township council that another noise study needs to be done before a commercial vehicle sales and repair facility in the 9700 block of 203 Street is approved. Property owner John Williams (R) told Langley Township Council the delays because of resident noise concerns over his proposed facility have added $1 million to his expenses.
— image credit: Dan FERGUSON/Langley Times

A proposed heavy truck repair facility for the 9700 block of 203 Street has generated opposition from neighbours concerned about noise.

Both sides got to make their case to the Township of Langley council on Monday (Jan. 28), with a delegation from the neighbourhood speaking at the afternoon meeting and a delegation from the company appearing at the evening session.

Rob Dekam, who brought a 90-name petition with him, said nearby residents are concerned that the sound tests carried out for the shop owner may show the facility won't exceed the average allowable noise limits, but don't allow for sudden peaks of noise generated by the big trucks and the shop tools.

Dekam presented a second noise assessment prepared for the residents by a consultant who recommends against the facility, citing potential noise problems posed by things like truck back-up beepers and shop air wrenches.

The residents consultant also said a proposed noise fence is not high enough at four metres to keep noise away from second-floor suites in the area.

Dekam urged council to have another noise study carried out by an independent third party.

"We would like another opinion," Dekam said.

Pacific Truck Development owner John Williams said he borrowed money to buy the property and the delays in approval caused by the residents objections could cost him as much as $1 million.

"The bank is kind of wondering what we're doing with it [the property]," Williams said.

The company has gone "over and above our responsibility" to mitigate noise, Williams said, and he would not consider raising his noise fence any higher.

"I didn't want to feel that we're in a prison on our own property that we just paid $10 million for," Williams said.

The issue is expected to come back to council for a decision at a later meeting.

 

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