Slideshow: Endangered frogs leap to their new home near Seabird Island

Oregon Spotted Frog released near Seabird Island by The Canadian Oregon Spotted Frog Recovery Team

The Canadian Oregon Spotted Frog Recovery Team released approximately 100 juvenile Oregon Spotted Frogs today at a restored wetland near Seabird Island.



The Canadian Oregon Spotted Frog Recovery Team released approximately 100 juvenile Oregon Spotted Frogs today at a restored wetland near Seabird Island.

 

The Oregon Spotted is Canada’s most endangered amphibian, and is only found in British Columbia’s Fraser valley.

“The frogs that we will be releasing have spent the winter in our facilities so they could have a chance to grow bigger,” said Andrea Gielens, project biologist. “These larger and more robust frogs will therefore have an increased chance of survival. The hope is that they will return in a couple of years to breed and help strengthen the overall Spotted Frog population.”

 

Frog’s hipped and hopped to their new home as they were gently released on site. The site was previously inhabited by the species, and located near a remnant population of frogs. At this site, nearly 7,000 tadpoles, juvenile and an adult frogs have been released between 2011 and 2016, where they will be protected.

 

Due to habitat destruction, the introduction of non-native species such as Eastern Canada’s bullfrog and pollution, their numbers have declined by as much as 90 per cent.

 

The juvenile frogs are reared in cooperation with the head-starting program of the Greater Vancouver and the Wildlife Preservation Canada and the captive breeding program of the Vancouver Aquarium. Between 2003 and 2017, approximately 15,000 captive-bred tadpoles and juvenile frogs have been released into suitable habitats to increase small existing populations in the wild.