Walnut Grove resident Marilyn Walper writes that the two minutes drivers will likely save with a 216 interchange won’t be worth effect the added traffic will have on the community.

Letter: More problems than benefits will result from 216 interchange

Editor: My husband and I moved to Walnut Grove over 30 years ago. We raised our two kids here. They attended school at Alex Hope and Walnut Grove Secondary, they played both soccer and softball with the local organizations, and they created many lasting friendships and memories here.

We are a community, and we look after each other.

While our kids were growing up, we never had to worry for our their safety walking to and from school or to a friend’s house because we always knew someone was looking out for them. Any given day you could take the kids out to feed the horses and cows in the neighbourhood. This was what drew us to Walnut Grove, it is where the country meets city. And what more could a young family ask for?

Walnut Grove used to be primarily made up of many young families, but now we have a new generation of Walnut Grovers.

Life has become very busy. We rush here and rush there, and sometimes we forget to stop and smell the roses.

By putting in the 216th interchange to save two minutes in a day, is it really worth it?

I don’t think people realize the impact it will have on our community. Gone will be the days of feeding  the horses in the neighbourhood, or taking quiet and safe bike rides with the kids. You will see 216th turn into one big idling parking lot, with new lights lining up and down the street.

The sweet smell of barbecue steak and exhaust, yum.

People from outside our community will not know where our playgrounds are or where our children may play. It will become road rage, racing to get in front of that one car to arrive home two minutes faster.

Criminals always look for an easy access — a nice direct route in and out — and we are serving it to them on a silver platter. Are we willing to sacrifice the health and safety of our families for shedding two minutes off our commute time? If you love the smell of exhaust, the continuous sound of cars, then maybe you  should consider moving to the city.

“All change is not growth, as all movement is not forward.”

Marilyn Walper,

Langley