Greater Langley Chamber of Commerce ‘disappointed’ with federal court ruling on Trans Mountain

Decision undermines investment confidence in Canada, writes Chamber president

The Federal Court of Appeal’s decision to shoot down Ottawa’s approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion is not sitting well with an organization that represents hundreds of businesses in Langley.

In a decision announced Thursday morning, the appeals court found that National Energy Board’s decision was “so flawed” that the feds could not base their approval on the board’s findings.

Reacting to the news later the same day, the Greater Langley Chamber of Commerce expressed disappointment, saying the ruling will lead to riskier methods for transporting crude oil through the community.

“The Greater Langley Chamber of Commerce is very disappointed with today’s decision from the Federal Court of Appeal to overturn the government’s approvals to build the Trans Mountain expansion project,” said Chamber president Jack Nicholson in a prepared statement.

“Moving crude oil by rail through suburbs is far more hazardous than using state-of-the art technology in pipelines. A large portion of the new construction of the Trans Mountain Pipeline will go through Langley via rail. This is not the safest method for our community.

“This decision again undermines investment confidence in Canada,” Nicholson continued.

“Why would investors consider Canada as a place to do business?”

The decision came down minutes before 99 per cent of Kinder Morgan shareholders voted to finalize the sale of the Trans Mountain pipeline to Canada.

The court said that the NEB “unjustifiably defined the scope of the project under review not to include project-related tanker traffic.”

This allowed the board to ignore any harm increased tanker traffic could cause to Southern resident killer whales along the B.C. coast.

The appeals court decision also took aim at Ottawa’s failure to consult with Indigenous peoples.

Although the feds “acted in good faith and formed an appropriate plan for consultation,” they merely listened and recorded Indigenous objections and did not respond with “responsive, considered and meaningful dialogue.”

The court’s ruling means that the National Energy Board will have to redo its review of the Trans Mountain pipeline and the feds will have to reengage with Indigenous groups.

– files from Katya Slepian, Black Press

Just Posted

The man who gave up law school to work in a homeless shelter

Joshua Medcalf is keynote speaker for 2018 Leadership Superconference at Langley Events Centre

Man who abducted and assaulted 11-year-old Langley girl has parole rules tightened

Brian Abrosimo made ‘inappropriate and sexualized’ comments

VIDEO: Langley-based Fraser Valley Fusion 2002A crowned champions in Oregon

Fastpitch team takes Triple Crown Sports Valley South 16U Tournament in Medford

‘Police are ready’ for legal pot, say Canadian chiefs

But Canadians won’t see major policing changes as pot becomes legal

VIDEO: Fans turn out for anniversary of iconic antique store in Langley

Weekend event was also a fund-raiser for Salvation Army Gateway of Hope

Naked man jumping into Toronto shark tank a ‘premeditated’ stunt: official

The man swam in a tank at Ripley’s Aquarium of Canada

Trump: Saudi king ‘firmly denies’ any role in Khashoggi mystery

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is travelling to the Middle East to learn more about the fate of the Saudi national

Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen dies at 65

Allen died in Seattle from complications of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma

Transport Canada to take new look at rules, research on school bus seatbelts

Canada doesn’t currently require seatbelts on school buses

Sockeye run in Shuswap expected to be close to 2014 numbers

Salute to the Sockeye on Adams River continues until Sunday, Oct. 21 at 4 p.m.

Michelle Mungall’s baby first in B.C. legislature chamber

B.C. energy minister praises support of staff, fellow MLAs

Canucks: Pettersson in concussion protocol, Beagle out with broken forearm

Head coach Travis Green called the hit ‘a dirty play’

Aldergrove Starfish program gets boost

Jazz Pilots for Kids donates $4,871 for after-school food program

Most Read