Rescued cougar kittens, Rocket and Rosie, are forming an unbeatable bond at the Greater Vancouver Zoo.

In the heart of Aldergrove, discover a wilderness like no other…

Visit the Greater Vancouver Zoo this summer and get in tune with nature, wildlife and conservation

Connecting with nature has many benefits.

While a recent study shows that both adults and children are spending less time participating in activities in nature, those who do experience increased creativity and problem-solving performance. Spending time in nature may not only nurture creative thinking, but also connect us to the wildlife that call their natural surroundings home.

For some, learning about wildlife exists only in textbooks, and seeing nature’s beautiful animals is possible only in Netflix documentaries. However, the Greater Vancouver Zoo in Aldergrove is home to an abundance of wildlife more diverse than anywhere else in the province. More than 140 species of animals live in the 120-acre park, including many rescued, donated and orphaned animals.

Nature In Your Backyard: See the animal wonder with your own eyes at your own pace

For those wishing to cycle or walk through the zoo at their own pace, viewing the diverse family of animals along the way, a full day’s itinerary will take you to the various “heart centres” of the zoo to learn about animals. You can even learn from the GVZoo Keepers about how they care for a wide range of wildlife, from raptors to reptiles and everything in between!

This year, the beloved train that runs through the zoo will also offer a fun and relaxing ride throughout the grounds, one of the ways the zoo offers an accessible experience.

An ongoing commitment to conservation and rescue reverberates throughout the zoo. The vital work of 52 staff and more than 50 volunteers is supported by visitors who come to share in the adventure; all contribute to a sustainable conservation effort.

August is Aldergrove: This summer head to Aldergrove to learn more about endangered wildlife

Visit the rescued cougar kittens, Rocket and Rosie, who are forming an unbeatable bond at Enclosure #22A, and meet Jenga and Pompey, arguably the tallest giraffe brothers at Enclosure #27.

The zoo is also working to prevent the Pacific Coast population of the Western Painted Turtle from the brink of extinction with an ambitious program that has been recognized with the Peter Karsten Conservation Award.

There’s truly something for everyone, so visit the Greater Vancouver Zoo this summer and get connected to nature and wildlife!

Plan your visit today at gvzoo.com

⋅ Distance: 3km to 4km | Bikes allowed

⋅ Family Friendly

⋅ Buy tickets and family passes online: tickets.gvzoo.com/mainstore.asp

 

The Greater Vancouver Zoo’s work to support the Pacific Coast population of the Western Painted Turtle, at risk of extinction, has been recognized with the Peter Karsten Conservation Award.

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