Residents along a portion of Zero Avenue aren't thrilled about nesting Canada geese and babies crossing the busy road.

American geese cross border with babies, and carnage ensues along Zero Avenue

The nesting geese cross the busy road several times a day. Drivers are asked to slow down.

They may be called Canada geese by name, but by address they are very much American. Langley residents living along a portion of Zero Avenue wish these waterfowl would stay in the States.

The Canadian geese are already nesting and babies are hatching. Then they will start crossing the road several times a day in the 23200 block of Zero Avenue, said resident Trudy Handel.

“It’s been a real frustration. Drivers are going way too fast, and many geese and babies are killed each year,” said Handel. Neighbours have just put up their own sandwich boards on the side of the road last week saying “watch for baby geese.”

The Township did put up another Watch for Wildlife sign but it hasn’t helped with many drivers looking for deer crossing, said Handel.

Apparently the grass is greener on the Canadian side, as this year’s batch of mother geese get ready to take their goslings from their swamp home on the American side of  Zero Ave. across the road to the Canadian side to eat grass several times a day.

The Langley RCMP are aware of the problem and are warning drivers to watch for this “seasonal hazard” and slow down. Speed enforcement may be looked at for that area.

Handel said it’s not so much about the geese, but about the dangers of these feathered friends crossing the road.

“Someone is going to get hurt.”

She hears drivers honking at the geese and has seen near rear-enders and head-on collisions as drivers try to maneuver around the big birds.

Handel has spoken to wildlife experts and fencing doesn’t even deter these determined American geese from crossing the road.

Neighbours in the area are hoping for some speed enforcement and a dramatic sign warning drivers.

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