Nitrogen trifluoride is a greenhouse has 17,200 more potent than carbon monoxide. (Taiyu Industrial Gas)

UPDATED: B.C. seeks study on a particularly powerful greenhouse gas

Province wants info on nitrogen trifluoride, which is 17,000 times more potent than carbon monoxide

The province is spending up to $10,000 to see how much of a particular greenhouse gas is being emitted by businesses.

In a request for proposal issued earlier this month, the environment ministry says it’s looking to quantify emissions of nitrogen trifluoride, a colourless, odorless, nonflammable gas that’s used in the production of microelectronics, predominantly in flat-panel displays, such as TVs, and thin-film solar cells.

As a greenhouse gas, it’s 17,200 times more potent than carbon monoxide.

UBC atmospheric sciences professor Douw Steyn says he’s surprised.

“I didn’t know we had much of an electronic manufacturing sector,” said Steyn. The province has a booming tech sector, he added, but that’s largely software.

The study falls in line with Canada’s pledge to monitor nitrogen trifluoride as part of its climate change commitments to the United Nations, Steyn said, and when the results come in, staff will be able to put B.C. emissions in context with those from other provinces and other countries.

“The current measurements tell us that it’s predominantly coming from the northern hemisphere,” he said.

Nitrogen trifluoride emissions stay in the atmosphere for 750 years, he said, and depletes the ozone layer.

An environment ministry spokesperson told Black Press that the province has a target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 80 per cent by 2050.

Currently, the province does not measure nitrogen trifluoride emissions.

The $10,000 price tag will cover a look at the options for conducting the study, B.C.’s levels of emissions for various industries, the cost of reporting emissions for facilities, and technologies and practices for mitigating emissions.


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Abattoir proposal has south Langley residents on edge

Opponents to poultry slaughterhouse application say aquifer could be at risk

Auditors couldn’t tell if Fraser Health executives bought booze on taxpayers’ dime

Review from 2014 says one administrator bought Bose headphones on company credit card

VIDEO: Dashcam records near-miss by bad driver

Dash cam captures pickup truck illegally passing on highway shoulder in Langley

Wire theft on the rise again in Langley City

As world price for copper rises, more incidents are being reported

A disappointing end to a succesful season for TWU volleyball

Past teams have used tough losses to fuel championship runs, says Spartans coach

Ottawa proposes restricted pot labels, packages

Packaging will include red stop sign with marijuana leaf and ‘THC’

Alberta budget plans for Trans Mountain expansion

Finance Minister Joe Ceci says expected revenues will be factored into budget forecasts

B.C. climber remembered for gentle spirit, love of mountains

Marc-André Leclerc had been hearing the call of the mountains since childhood

Proposed gun bill attacked by gun owners and shooting victims

The federal government tabled the bill today in order to tighten the sale and tracking of firearms

New anti-radicalization centre in the works for B.C.

Centre aims to help ‘vulnerable individuals of the path to radicalization’ before they turn to crime

B.C. bravery, public service honoured by Governor General Julie Payette

UVic basketball coach Kathryn Shields inducted into Order of Canada

Sea lion with rope wrapped around neck saved by Vancouver Aquarium

Steller sea lions are a species of special concern and some populations are endangered in parts of Alaska

B.C. can learn from Washington’s wine industry growth

Winery owner cites importance of industry collaboration

Most Read