More than 6,000 Shaw Communication employees have been offered buyout packages (Facebook/Shaw)

Shaw offers severance packages to thousands of employees

The company is looking to scale down due to changing consumer trends

  • Jan. 30, 2018 11:30 a.m.

Changes are coming to Shaw Communications Inc. as the company has announced a voluntary buyout program for many of its workers.

An internal memo obtained by Black Press Media details how the company is “building for the future” by offering a “generous severance package” to more than 6,000 employees. The one-time offer is designed to motivate Shaw employees to think critically about their future with the company and make realistic decisions about their role in Shaw’s evolution, according to a Q+A portion of the memo from company president Jay Mehr.

“The Voluntary Departure Program will provide eligible, non-union employees with the chance to both evaluate the opportunities and demands of Shaw’s future, and decide if they want to participate in it,” the memo reads.

“To continue to drive the business and ensure customer experience is not affected during this program, customer-facing employees in Customer Care, Retail and Sales and their direct leaders will not be eligible for the program. This program will be made available in the future to employees currently not eligible, should business needs arise.”

Employees who are eligible for the program will get a severance package by Wednesday, Jan. 31. They will have until Feb. 14 to decide whether or not to accept. Departure dates will roll out over the next 18 months and those employees accepting the buy-out will leave the company between March 2 and April 6 of this year.

With the changing landscape in technology and digital media, Shaw Communications says they’re at a critical point in defining all aspects of their business model – from how they deliver products and services to how they manage their business.

“As we move into a new “low-touch”, digitized operating model, we cannot guarantee that what you do, where you do it or who you do it with will stay the same—we are transforming, from the ground up,” the memo goes on to say.

“To achieve this transformation, we will all work smarter in a re-imagined, integrated organization built for collective success. We will be fewer and the excellence of our work will increase.”

The company ends by saying they are sincerely grateful to all their employees, and the end result will be a company more capable and relevant for the future.

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