Lawyers often take stances on both sides of a policy

On major policies,the country is rife with lawyers on both sides of the issue.

Editor: The controversy about Trinity Western University’s proposed law school is now over. Young people in Langley and beyond can look forward to attending law school in Langley.

Now that the directors of the Law Society of B.C. have decided, in a 20 to 6 vote, to accept TWU graduates, three key points should be made.

First, since the Federation of Law Societies of Canada, after an 18-month study, approved the TWU proposal, the B.C. body had no reason to be opposed. Second, at present many universities in the U.S. and elsewhere have similar faith and conduct requirements. They have produced fine attorneys.

Third, the argument that TWU graduates could not be good lawyers because they have agreed to a university policy upholding traditional marriage is deeply flawed. The TWU policy deals with behaviour while the students are at TWU, not with a life-long commitment. Also, about 50 per cent of Canadians support this view.

Further, as every lawyer knows, concerning any social policy, whether rooted in the constitution, the Charter, or legislation, numerous lawyers are in opposition. On major policies dealing with capital punishment, euthanasia, compulsory vaccination, decriminalizing marijuana, same-sex marriage, etc. the country is rife with lawyers on both sides of the issue. The TWU law school won’t cause or affect that reality.

Read history, lawyers. Freedom prescribes diversity and social progress has come through dissenting minorities, not by imposition of views by majorities.

John H. Redekop,

Abbotsford

Just Posted

‘It’s like a party in your mouth’

Langley creator’s Milkshake Burger makes its debut at the PNE

Grass fire closes Mufford overpass to traffic

Township fire crews using ladder truck to battle blaze

Chilliwack gymnast to compete in Pan American Championships

Canadian national teamer Zachary Clay travels to Peru in September for international competition.

Trinity Western University changes controversial covenant

Pledge forbidding sexual intimacy outside of marriage optional, but only for students

Pitt Meadows airport manager resigns

Guy Miller was just two months on the job

Average Canadian family spends 43% of income on taxes: study

Fraser Institute’s consumer report shows taxes accounting for larger chunk of income each year

RCMP to search for body after man drowns in B.C.’s Buntzen Lake

Officers and fire crews responded but the man from the Lower Mainland is believed to have drowned.

Police chiefs call for stricter controls on pill presses to fight opioids

Canada’s police chiefs are urging Ottawa to beef up its fight against the opioid scourge by closely vetting people who import pill presses

Hot, dry conditions forces drought rating to highest level on Vancouver Island

The province says Vancouver Island is under Stage 4 drought conditions

Victoria police say explicit calls continue to target women

Over 50 reports of unwanted, sexually explicit calls have come in

Get involved in the Great Canadian Bumble Bee Count

Environmental organization develops app to help with the nationwide count

Pesticides linked to bee deaths will be phased out in Canada, sources say

Neonicotinoids, or neonics, are a class of pesticides used by farmers and hobby gardeners alike

Wildfire smoke blankets B.C. and Alberta, prompting air quality advisories

About 25 new wildfires were sparked between Monday morning and midday Tuesday

Most Read