Lawyers often take stances on both sides of a policy

On major policies,the country is rife with lawyers on both sides of the issue.

Editor: The controversy about Trinity Western University’s proposed law school is now over. Young people in Langley and beyond can look forward to attending law school in Langley.

Now that the directors of the Law Society of B.C. have decided, in a 20 to 6 vote, to accept TWU graduates, three key points should be made.

First, since the Federation of Law Societies of Canada, after an 18-month study, approved the TWU proposal, the B.C. body had no reason to be opposed. Second, at present many universities in the U.S. and elsewhere have similar faith and conduct requirements. They have produced fine attorneys.

Third, the argument that TWU graduates could not be good lawyers because they have agreed to a university policy upholding traditional marriage is deeply flawed. The TWU policy deals with behaviour while the students are at TWU, not with a life-long commitment. Also, about 50 per cent of Canadians support this view.

Further, as every lawyer knows, concerning any social policy, whether rooted in the constitution, the Charter, or legislation, numerous lawyers are in opposition. On major policies dealing with capital punishment, euthanasia, compulsory vaccination, decriminalizing marijuana, same-sex marriage, etc. the country is rife with lawyers on both sides of the issue. The TWU law school won’t cause or affect that reality.

Read history, lawyers. Freedom prescribes diversity and social progress has come through dissenting minorities, not by imposition of views by majorities.

John H. Redekop,

Abbotsford

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