Letter: Those who have chosen the homeless lifestyle shouldn’t expect to dictate terms

Editor: Re: Langley City deal offers shelter for homeless campers (the Times, Sept. 21). The article states that homelessness has cost City $249,000.

I certainly believe this cost is true. Actually, I believe it is higher.

There are many things screaming blatantly from the article.

I want to applaud City Chief Administrator Francis Cheung for taking the lead and his actions in addressing some of the issues (if only temporarily) for this plight that inflicts this province and will for a long time.

There are many problems with (the approach to) homelessness. First, allowing them a flexible curfew and “availability to smoke throughout the night” is wrong.

When do people who have chosen the lifestyle they live as a homeless person, have the right to dictate back?

It’s similar to saying a prisoner who commits crimes and finds himself in jail has the right to dictate his conditions upon confinement.

You are confined for a reason. Either you are jailed by your circumstances or your actions.  And how can someone who is homeless without an income afford cigarettes?

I don’t smoke, but smokers have told me that cigarettes are expensive.  How can they afford that luxury?

Then the article goes on to say that some homeless have up to 21 buggies.

Seriously? Those buggies were definitely stolen. It’s not like they bought them with their hard-earned cash from going to a real job every day.

And I bet most of the contents were stolen.

People find themselves in their predicament mainly because of the decisions they have made in their lives.  There is always consequences for every decision — good and bad.

If you don’t think outside of the moment or the emotion you find yourself in, you are dealing with consequences.

You choose to live with it and shut your mouth; or complain like an out-of-control child who doesn’t want discipline.

I am fully in agreement with the residents who live within the boundary of 208 Street and Fraser Highway to loudly voice their complaints.

Keep complaining.

There is an issue here that should be dealt with; but not with the kid glove approach.

Please remember, a lot of these homeless chose to be homeless.

I believe we have more pressing issues in this community that needs our attention; teenagers who desperately need stability and structure to stay in school and be educated beyond the drug-addicted world they find their parents catering to.

There, you will still find hope.

There, you will still be able to reach someone and help them beyond the circumstances they find themselves in beyond their control.

A person who makes a choice to live on a floodplain has plainly chosen not to seek professional help or the avenues available to them to get out of their situation.

They like where they are and they like to dictate their conditions.

Move them until they are in the woods and alone and seriously have to address living in their own decisions.

Try living in the wilderness.  It’s much harder than the flood plains of Langley City.

Sandra Steffan,


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